Immunizations

Vaccines for Children is a federally funded program to help provide important immunizations to children who might not otherwise be vaccinated because of inability to pay. To qualify a child must be 18 years of age or under and enrolled in Medicaid, uninsured, under-insured*, American Indian or Alaska native. A donation of $15 per immunization is requested.

Adult immunization program is a federally funded program to help provide important immunizations to adults who are uninsured or underinsured*.

Private immunizations are provided for individuals who have insurance coverage or cannot qualify for VFC or Adult immunizations.


Chickenpox-
Chickenpox (also called varicella) is a common childhood disease. It is usually mild, but it can be serious, especially in young infants and adults.

Who should get the chickenpox vaccine?

Children who have never had chickenpox should get 2 doses of chickenpox vaccine at these ages:

  • 12–15 months
  • 4–6 years of age (may be given earlier, if at least 3 months after the 1st dose)
  • People 13 years of age and older (who have never had chickenpox or received chickenpox vaccine) should get two doses at least 28 days apart.

For more information visit www.cdc.gov/vaccines

DTaP- Diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis are serious diseases caused by bacteria. Diphtheria and pertussis are spread from person to person. Tetanus enters the body through cuts or wounds.

Diptheria causes a thick covering in the back of the throat. It can lead to breathing problems, paralysis, heart failure, and even death.

Tetnus (Lockjaw) causes painful tightening of the muscles, usually all over the body. It can lead to “locking” of the jaw so the victim cannot open his mouth or swallow. Tetanus leads to death in up to 2 out of 10 cases.

Pertussis (Whooping Cough) causes coughing spells so bad that it is hard for infants to eat, drink, or breathe. These spells can last for weeks.  It can lead to pneumonia, seizures (jerking and staring spells), brain damage, and death.

Who should get the DTaP vaccine?

Children should get 5 doses of DTaP vaccine, one dose at each of the following ages:

  • 2 months
  • 4 months
  • 6 months
  • 15–18 months
  • 4–6 years

For more information visit www.cdc.gov/vaccines

Hib- Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) disease is a serious disease caused by bacteria. It usually affects children under 5 years old. It can also affect adults with certain medical conditions.

Who should get the Hib vaccine?

Doses of Hib vaccine are usually recommended at these ages:

  • 2 months
  • 4 months
  • 6 months
  • 12–15 months

For more information visit www.cdc.gov/vaccines

Hepatitis A- Hepatitis A is a serious liver disease caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). HAV is found in the stool of people with hepatitis A. It is usually spread by close personal contact and sometimes by eating food or drinking water containing HAV. A person who has hepatitis A can easily pass the disease to others within the same household.

Who should get the Hepatitis A vaccine?

  • Anyone 1 year of age or older who wants protection from hepatitis A

Hepatitis B- Hepatitis B is a serious infection that affects the liver. It is caused by the hepatitis B virus. Hepatitis B virus is easily spread through contact with the blood or other body fluids of an infected person. People can also be infected from contact with a contaminated object, where the virus can live for up to 7 days.

Who should get the Hepatitis B vaccine?

Babies normally get 3 doses of hepatitis B vaccine:

  • Birth
  • 1-2 months
  • 6-18 months

Anyone through 18 years of age who didn’t get the vaccine when they were younger should also be vaccinated with 3 doses.

For more information visit www.cdc.gov/vaccines

HPV- HPV infection usually comes from sexual contact, and most people will become infected at some point in their life. About 14 million Americans get infected every year. Many infections will go away and not cause serious problems. But thousands of women and men get cancer and diseases from HPV. Gardasil-9 prevents many cancers caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infections, including: cervical cancer in females, vaginal and vulvar cancers in females, and anal cancer in females and males.

Who should get the HPV vaccine? Gardasil-9 is one of three FDA-approved HPV vaccines. It is recommended for both males and females. It is routinely given at 11 or 12 years of age, but it may be given beginning at age 9 years through age 26 years. Three doses of Gardasil-9 are recommended with the second and third dose 1-2 months and 6 months after the first dose

For more information visit www.cdc.gov/vaccines

Influenza- Influenza (“flu”) is a contagious disease that spreads around the United States every year, usually between October and May. Flu is caused by influenza viruses, and is spread mainly by coughing, sneezing, and close contact.

Who should get the Influenza vaccine?

A dose of flu vaccine is recommended every flu season. Children 6 months through 8 years of age may need two doses during the same flu season. Everyone else needs only one dose each flu season.

For more information visit www.cdc.gov/vaccines

Meningococcal- Meningococcal disease is a serious bacterial illness. It is a leading cause of bacterial meningitis in children 2 through 18 years old in the United States. Meningitis is an infection of the covering of the brain and the spinal cord. Meningococcal disease also causes blood infections.

Who should get the Meningococcal vaccine?

Two doses of MCV4 are recommended for adolescents 11 through 18 years of age: the first dose at 11 or 12 years of age, with a booster dose at age 16.

For more information visit www.cdc.gov/vaccines

MMR- Measles, mumps, and rubella are serious diseases.

Measles virus causes rash, cough, runny nose, eye irritation, and fever. It can lead to ear infection, pneumonia, seizures (jerking and staring), brain damage, and death.

Mumps virus causes fever, headache, muscle pain, loss of appetite, and swollen glands. It can lead to deafness, meningitis (infection of the brain and spinal cord covering), painful swelling of the testicles or ovaries, and rarely sterility.

Rubella (German Measles) Rubella virus causes rash, arthritis (mostly in women), and mild fever. If a woman gets rubella while she is pregnant, she could have a miscarriage or her baby could be born with serious birth defects.

These diseases spread from person to person through the air. You can easily catch them by being around someone who is already infected.

Who should get the MMR vaccine?

Children should get 2 doses of MMR vaccine:

  • 12–15 months of age
  • 4–6 years

Some adults should also get MMR vaccine: Generally, anyone 18 years of age or older who was born after 1956 should get at least one dose of MMR vaccine, unless they can show that they have either been vaccinated or had all three diseases.

For more information visit www.cdc.gov/vaccines

MMRV- Measles, Mumps, Rubella, and Varicella (chickenpox) can be serious diseases:

Measles Causes rash, cough, runny nose, eye irritation, fever. Can lead to ear infection, pneumonia, seizures, brain damage, and death.

Mumps Causes fever, headache, swollen glands. Can lead to deafness, meningitis (infection of the brain and spinal cord covering), infection of the pancreas, painful swelling of the testicles or ovaries, and, rarely, death.

Rubella (German Measles) Causes rash and mild fever; and can cause arthritis, (mostly in women).  If a woman gets rubella while she is pregnant, she could have a miscarriage or her baby could be born with serious birth defects.

Varicella (Chickenpox) Causes rash, itching, fever, tiredness. Can lead to severe skin infection, scars, pneumonia, brain damage, or death. Can re-emerge years later as a painful rash called shingles. These diseases can spread from person to person through the air. Varicella can also be spread through contact with fluid from chickenpox blisters.

Who should get the MMRV vaccine?

MMRV vaccine may be given to children from 1 through 12 years of age to protect them from these four diseases.

Two doses of MMRV vaccine are recommended:

  • 12 through 15 months
  • 4 through 6 years

For more information visit www.cdc.gov/vaccines

Pneumococcal (Prevnar 13)- Vaccination can protect both children and adults from pneumococcal disease. Pneumococcal disease is caused by bacteria that can spread from person to person through close contact.

 It can cause ear infections, and it can also lead to more serious infections of the: Lungs (pneumonia), Blood (bacteremia), and Covering of the brain and spinal cord (meningitis). Pneumococcal pneumonia is most common among adults. Pneumococcal meningitis can cause deafness and brain damage, and it kills about 1 child in 10 who get it. Anyone can get pneumococcal disease, but children under 2 years of age and adults 65 years and older, people with certain medical conditions, and cigarette smokers are at the highest risk.

Who should get the Pneumococcal vaccine?

PCV13 is routinely given to children at:

  • 2 months
  • 4 months
  • 6 Months
  • 12–15 months
 

It is also recommended for children and adults 2 to 64 years of age with certain health conditions, and for all adults 65 years of age and older.

Your doctor can give you details.

For more information visit www.cdc.gov/vaccines

Pneumonia (Pnuemovax 23)- Pneumococcal disease is caused by bacteria that can spread from person to person through close contact. It can cause ear infections, and it can also lead to more serious infections of the: Lungs (pneumonia), Blood (bacteremia), and Covering of the brain and spinal cord (meningitis). Meningitis can cause deafness and brain damage, and it can be fatal. Anyone can get pneumococcal disease, but children under 2 years of age, people with certain medical conditions, adults over 65 years of age, and cigarette smokers are at the highest risk.

Who should get the Pneumonia vaccine?

PPSV23 is recommended for:

  • All adults 65 years of age and older
  • Anyone 2 through 64 years of age with certain longterm health problems
  • Anyone 2 through 64 years of age with a weakened immune system
  • Adults 19 through 64 years of age who smoke cigarettes or have asthma

For more information visit www.cdc.gov/vaccines

Polio- Polio is a disease caused by a virus. It enters the body through the mouth. Usually it does not cause serious illness. But sometimes it causes paralysis (can’t move arm or leg), and it can cause meningitis (irritation of the lining of the brain). It can kill people who get it, usually by paralyzing the muscles that help them breathe.

Who should get the Polio vaccine?

Children get 4 doses of IPV, at these ages:

  • 2 months
  • 4 months
  • 6-18 months
  • 4–6 years

Adults who have never been vaccinated should get 3 doses of IPV.

For more information visit www.cdc.gov/vaccines

 

Rotavirus- Rotavirus is a virus that causes diarrhea, mostly in babies and young children. The diarrhea can be severe, and lead to dehydration. Vomiting and fever are also common in babies with rotavirus.

Who should get the Rotavirus vaccine?

Your child must get the first dose of rotavirus vaccine before 15 weeks of age, and the last by age 8 months.

 Doses are recommended at these ages:

  • 2 months
  • 4 months
  • 6 months

Rotavirus vaccine may safely be given at the same time as other vaccines. Almost all babies who get rotavirus vaccine will be protected from severe rotavirus diarrhea. And most of these babies will not get rotavirus diarrhea at all. The vaccine will not prevent diarrhea or vomiting caused by other germs.

For more information visit www.cdc.gov/vaccines

Shingles- Shingles is a painful skin rash, often with blisters. It is also called Herpes Zoster, or just Zoster. A shingles rash usually appears on one side of the face or body and lasts from 2 to 4 weeks. Its main symptom is pain, which can be quite severe. Other symptoms of shingles can include fever, headache, chills and upset stomach.

Who should get the Shingles vaccine?

A single dose of shingles vaccine is recommended for adults 60 years of age and older.

A vaccine for shingles was licensed in 2006. In clinical trials, the vaccine reduced the risk of shingles by 50%. It can also reduce pain in people who still get shingles after being vaccinated.

For more information visit www.cdc.gov/vaccines

 

Td- Tetanus and diphtheria are very serious diseases. They are rare in the United States today, but people who do become infected often have severe complications. Td vaccine is used to protect adolescents and adults from both of these diseases. Both tetanus and diphtheria are infections caused by bacteria.

Diphtheria spreads from person to person through coughing or sneezing. Diphtheria can cause a thick coating to form in the back of the throat. It can lead to breathing problems, paralysis, heart failure, and death.

Tetanus (Lockjaw) causes painful muscle tightening and stiffness, usually all over the body. It can lead to tightening of muscles in the head and neck so you can’t open your mouth, swallow, or sometimes even breathe. Tetanus-causing bacteria enter the body through cuts, scratches, or wounds. Tetanus kills about 1 out of every 10 people who are infected even after receiving the best medical care.

Who should get the Td vaccine?

Td vaccine can protect adolescents and adults from tetanus and diphtheria. Td is usually given as a booster dose every 10 years but it can also be given earlier after a severe and dirty wound or burn. Another vaccine, called TDaP, which protects against pertussis in addition to tetanus and diphtheria, is sometimes recommended instead of Td vaccine.

For more information visit www.cdc.gov/vaccines

 

TDaP- Tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis are very serious diseases. Tdap vaccine can protect us from these diseases. And, Tdap vaccine given to pregnant women can protect newborn babies against pertussis.

Tetanus (Lockjaw) is rare in the United States today. It causes painful muscle tightening and stiffness, usually all over the body. It can lead to tightening of muscles in the head and neck so you can’t open your mouth, swallow, or sometimes even breathe. Tetanus kills about 1 out of 10 people who are infected even after receiving the best medical care.

Diphtheria is also rare in the United States today. It can cause a thick coating to form in the back of the throat. • It can lead to breathing problems, heart failure, paralysis, and death.

Pertussis (Whooping Cough) causes severe coughing spells, which can cause difficulty breathing, vomiting and disturbed sleep.  It can also lead to weight loss, incontinence, and rib fractures. Up to 2 in 100 adolescents and 5 in 100 adults with pertussis are hospitalized or have complications, which could include pneumonia or death.

These diseases are caused by bacteria. Diphtheria and pertussis are spread from person to person through secretions from coughing or sneezing. Tetanus enters the body through cuts, scratches, or wounds

Who should get the TDaP vaccine?

Tdap vaccine can protect adolescents and adults from tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis. One dose of Tdap is routinely given at age 11 or 12. People who did not get Tdap at that age should get it as soon as possible. Tdap is especially important for healthcare professionals and anyone having close contact with a baby younger than 12 months. Pregnant women should get a dose of Tdap during every pregnancy, to protect the newborn from pertussis. Infants are most at risk for severe, life-threatening complications from pertussis.

For more information visit www.cdc.gov/vaccines

*Underinsured is defined as commercial (private) health insurance but the coverage does not include vaccines, Insurance that only covers certain vaccines (VFC eligible for non-covered vaccines only), Insurance caps vaccine coverage at a certain amount (once that coverage amount is reached then can be categorized as underinsured) High deductible insurance is NOT considered uninsured.

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Three Rivers Public Health Department

2400 North Lincoln Avenue, Fremont, NE 68025  ~  402-727-5396 / 1-866-727-5396
Serving Dodge, Saunders & Washington Counties in Eastern Nebraska

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